The Narrative Structure of Counterfeit Money 1

The economic cycle of confession and unforgiveness (121)
There is a structure of narrative relation between the friend and the narrator in Counterfeit Money. This is expressed in what the friend recounts to the narrator, “it was the counterfeit coin,” boasting and confessing, what in truth happened. This telling of the truth by the friend produces an effect on the narrator, creating an event on the side of the narrator, the narrator is provoked by his friend’s confession.

Derrida characterises this act of confession as the heart of the economic circle of the narrative, of the friend giving the counterfeit coin, then confessing his actions “without repentance and without mercy.” In doing this he gives himself to view, he gives himself over to judgment. The narrator takes no account of this gift and does not respond to it with forgiveness.

Derrida now asks “if the friend sought to provoke the narrator, what did he want to push him to do? And how?” Speculating that the relation of the narrative is there in what it withholds from seeing.

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This entry was posted in Art as Gift, Chapter 4 Posts, Confession, Counterfeit Money, Derrida, Event, Gift, Given Time, Narrative, Unforgiveness. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to The Narrative Structure of Counterfeit Money 1

  1. Pingback: The narrative structure of Counterfeit Money 1 | Derek Hampson

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